Staying Motivated Whilst Searching for a new Job

Studies have shown that the average job seeker gives up searching for a job after 5 months. Do you fall into this category?

Are you staring at an empty page, trying to write the next cover letter or to update your CV? Are you postponing the grip and grin meeting you’ve scheduled? Has laziness started to set in? Has your get up and go taken a permanent vacation? Well, you are not alone. Staying motivated during a prolonged job search is more challenging than actually going for an interview.

Here are some tips to keep you motivated:

  1. Keep busy by lending a hand: Do volunteer work or help a neighbor in need. This will raise your self-esteem and the feel good quotient that can be sorely depleted during a job search.
  2. Get temp or contract work: This will give you a few bucks and provide structure to your week.
  3. Shake your booty: Move, exercise or dance. The endorphin release alone will carry you forward into more activity.
  4. Get rid of clutter: Throw out stuff or donate it to charity. This will make you feel good about the new space you’ve created.
  5. Learn from the successful job seeker: Do you know someone that recently found a job? Find out how they did it. They may just have some secrets to share with you.
  6. Drop the whiners: Your sanity depends on this. The last thing you need when looking for a job is a pity party.
  7. Join a job search club: Get support from other job seekers. Many state employment offices offer job groups, as do local community centers and churches.
  8. Fertilize your brain: Instead of watching TV, read positive and inspirational material for at least 30 minutes each day.
  9. Start your day with structure: It might be tempting to sleep in or lounge around in pajamas all day, but getting your day moving can provide you with a psychological boost. If you have a partner who has a job, get up at the same time that they prepare for work, shower, get dressed and tackle your job search.
  10. Use the internet to find a job: Read up on hints to find a new career or look at ways to find a job via social media websites (like Facebook and Twitter). The Internet is an excellent resource to find a new job.
  11. Give yourself a break: The familiar advice of persistence paying off holds true for finding a job. After all, you can’t land a position if you don’t even apply. Yet, while dedication will pay off in the long run, sometimes it helps to step away for a bit. Sending a CV out while in a sad or defeated mood could lead to typos or other errors that could cost you consideration for the job. Don’t overdo it, take a break to refresh your mood and your mind if you need it.

It is easy to feel frustrated when your E-mail / SMS inbox is filled with rejections or if you aren’t even acknowledged after pouring your heart into landing a seemingly perfect position. Job seekers are often hard on themselves when faced with such disappointments, but it pays to remember that setbacks are only a bump on a long career path that will have ups and downs. Take a look at your CV to remind yourself of what you have accomplished, and when you’re feeling better about your capabilities, get back to sending it out. Someone out there is waiting to read it.

Keeping motivated during a job search is a constant test of your patience and fortitude, particularly if you’ve come in second, or been rejected outright, by a company you really wanted to work for. Know that everyone feels discouraged at times. But, the name of the game is staying persistent despite the difficulties. You do that by continuing to move forward, not dwelling on the negatives and keeping your eyes focused on the prize: Getting the Job!

If you think your CV needs some more work? Why not download the Job Mail CV template posted on our previous post.

Remember to get a friend to read over your CV and motivational letter because if you can’t convince them to hire you, then it may be time to relook your brand messaging.

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Henno Kruger

Digital Marketing Channel Co-ordinator / Blogger at Job Mail

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4 Responses

  1. Mahlatse says:

    Thanks guys for your information, it really make a significant impact in the away approach things in so far as getting a job is concerned.

    I have been to the interviews almost two weeks ago and now my question is:is it advisable to contact the interviewer and ask how the interview went? I am a bit impatient please send a response to my email address which is mahlatseprince@yahoo.com.

    Thank you in anticipation.

    • Job Mailer says:

      Hi Mahlatse

      Thank you so much for your positive feedback. We are glad that this blog post helped you to stay motivated whilst looking for a new job. The key is to keep your messages positive when you follow-up. Don’t sound accusatory – just remind the interviewer of your conversation, say you enjoyed it and ask where they are in the process. It may help to prepare a script ahead of time. Perhaps you feel that you didn’t make the best impression in the interview. The follow-up is your chance to recover.Tell them you’re going to provide them with additional resources. If you can send documentation of your abilities or even get references to send notes on your behalf please do so. When you follow-up via a call or e-mail and the news is bad. We suggest that you thank the person for letting you know. Then ask if the interviewer would be willing to give you any feedback that you could use for future interviews. The answer will likely be no, but it shows you’re interested in improving.Then keep networking with the interviewer, perhaps by forwarding occasional, well-chosen articles related to your industry, for example, or by joining a group on LinkedIn.

  2. Mahlatse says:

    Thanks once again, I will make a follow up and will give you a feedback.

  3. Mahlatse says:

    Thanks once again, I will make a follow up and will provide with a feedback.

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